Asking Why, Leads To Change

Healthcare-screenshotWhy?

A simple question that never gets asked enough. A question when asked, could lead to changes, small or big.

I was hit by an extraordinary event this week.

Earlier this week my wife called her health insurance company (through the healthcare.gov exchange) to cancel her coverage. After about 20 minutes on the phone the representative did enough to show my wife how she could cancel her insurance online (this could be a topic for another day). The rep advised her to follow the instructions on that cancellation page. The problem was, the cancellation wouldn’t take effect for 14 days, which is odd. Normally, insurance companies can cancel coverage the day you request termination, which is what we wanted to do. Although my wife didn’t know this, seeing how she isn’t an insurance agent like I am, I decided to help out in the matter. After all I’ve dealt with enough companies to know this 14 day rule the insurance company was claiming it would take to cancel, is not actually a rule.

I called the insurance company trying to get answers to this conundrum.

After 2 hours on the phone with 3 separate reps, this was the conclusion and answer I received: “I’m sorry sir this is the way the system is set up, I don’t know the law, but there is nothing I can do.”

To which I simply asked, why? Why would a system that is set up to not follow the law be in place? The rep had said to me they have had this complaint before, so why haven’t they done anything?

It was time for a change. I knew that when the rep said those words, it was going to be a battle. I knew that I would have to fight for change, so others wouldn’t have to be charged the same way we were.

I’m smart enough to understand I don’t know everything. But, what I do know is that no one knows everything. We do forget this from time to time though. The representatives at the insurance company are afraid to ask why the system is the way it is for fear of looking unintelligent. I know this because we all have fear in the same way.

If there is a 14 day rule, I would love to see or know where it is in the law, because then I could correct my understanding. Until then I will question why a system was put in place to contradict my understanding.

Think about that person who answers your question with, “I don’t know or that’s how it is.” Why aren’t they helping you to promote change?

The picture above is a screenshot I took of the healthcare.gov website. My goal is to get them to list

it takes 14 days to cancel a policy, or change the system they have in place to a faster processing one.

I don’t know if I will succeed, but at least I am asking why, which for me can hopefully lead to change for the benefit of those around me.

Where can you ask why? It doesn’t have to lead to major change, but what could be better for benefit of those around you?

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